How Much Does a Dogo Argentino Cost? Puppy Prices & Expenses

Dogo Argentino Price

Dogo Argentinos, also known as Argentinian Mastiffs, are very versatile dogs. The dogs were first bred in 1928 by an Argentinian doctor called Antonio Nores Martinez to create a large and muscular chaser animal.

Despite their reputation as a hunter, they can also be considered as guardian dogs due to their known kindness towards owners and family members.

This is the reason why I got my Argentino, as I found it fascinating that they are not that aggressive to human beings. Through the years, I have gained knowledge and understanding of how to properly raise Dogo Argentinos.

However, I find that many first-time owners have difficulties in taking care of their Dogos, especially when it comes to choosing the right products.

Others also want to know the average price of Dogo Argentinos to have a heads up prior to purchase.

Thanks to my research and comparison with other experienced owners, I have made estimates, tables, and lists on the costs of owning a Dogo Argentino.

How much does a Dogo Argentino puppy cost? Average Dogo Argentino prices taken from reputable breeders range from $1,000 to $2,500. Purebred and championed bloodlines of the said breed can exceed $5,000, nearly doubling or tripling the price.

There are also other factors that can increase the price of your future Dogo but do not worry because I will discuss them further in the following sections.

Aside from payments made to cover puppy costs, we must also consider other expenses. These expenses include initial item payments, monthly maintenance, yearly maintenance, as well as extra services you or your dog may need.

All of the things mentioned appear in this blog in lists and tables. This article was made to guide aspiring owners like you on estimated expenses so that you will have a good grasp on your journey.

Average Price of Dogo Argentino Puppies

Choosing to own an Argentino requires dedication, patience, and of course, money. Lower prices for these kinds of breed go for as low as one grand, but there are many factors which could increase the market price.

As versatile dogs capable of hunting and guarding, it takes commitment to raise these pets from puppyhood.

Here are factors that could change your puppy’s costs as you decide to buy them.

Breeder

As specialized breeds require a lot of physical and mental care, the quality of breeder is an important factor that Dogo enthusiasts should look upon.

A dog’s source acts as the main portion of its actual price, so you need to choose one carefully. Buying from an experienced breeder will surely boost the costs of your puppy, while a less experienced source will equal a lesser market price.

The types of breeders available in the market will be discussed below, with recommendations on where you should get them.

Bloodline

Genes play a part in your pup’s identity. An Argentino’s personality levels are handed on from their parents. You should remember this when buying your dog from a breeder.

Because of this, Dogos who come from generations that have won from previous shows would likely have their price doubled and even tripled.

A good bloodline equates to puppies that generally require less effort to train because of selectively existing genetic traits.

When I bought my puppy, I checked and double-checked his parent’s characteristics to build a better match for my family.

Breed Certifications and Kennel Club Papers

As expensive dogs, it is crucial to see the puppy’s documents and certificates before getting captivated by their adorable eyes.

Breed certification is one of these papers, and they help prove or confirm your dog’s authenticity. Genetic testing is a method employed to confirm the pup’s identity relative to their breed.

The American Kennel Club can give such certificates to guarantee a pup’s quality, but keep in mind that these come at a price and it could increase your Dogos cost.

Health Tests

Dogo Argentinos are generally healthy but they could also be susceptible to some diseases. These health problems include but are not limited to cataracts, deafness, and hip dysplasia.

To ensure quality assurance, breeders make use of medical tests which could cost them a hefty sum of money. These fees can then be charged to buyers for pre-ownership costs.

Other owners might look at these payments as an added burden, I see them as an investment. I’d rather pay more initially than be faced with shocking medical bills later because of unforeseen health issues. This should also be your mentality when purchasing a puppy.

Other Treatments

Other treatments that could increase a puppy’s initial costs are tick and worm removal. As future owners, we hate having these parasites on our beloved pets.

High-quality breeders make sure that your pups are rid of these pesky buggers, but the price might increase slightly. Again, see this as an investment rather than a pointless waste of money.

A good source makes use of all the factors stated above, and this is why the puppies they sell cost more. On my own Argentino, the initial payment was $1800.

This may seem high, but I thought that it was a good deal as my puppy had the proper papers, tests, and treatments. In buying your own puppy, you should always make sure that most of the considerations in this section are present.

Types of Dogo Argentino Breeders and Their Average Prices

Finding a good Dogo Argentino source is the first step in your journey as an owner. Breeders can be found everywhere, from the internet to local shops, and even ads.

To help you have an idea of good Dogo breeders, I have created a list of the usual sources in the market. This list also serves as my recommendation for future owners like you.

Puppy Mills

Getting your Dogo Argentino from a puppy millOpens in a new tab. is a big no-no. These kinds of businesses that act as animal factories pose great harm to puppies especially of this breed.

As a specialized breed, raising an Argentinian Mastiff from puppyhood requires proper care and knowledge of the breed as well as great commitment.

Puppy mills focus on quantity rather than quality, so they can never give out what a Dogo puppy needs from them. They treat dogs as objects rather than living beings.

If you choose to get your Argentino from a puppy mill, you can save up to a fourth of the price as they sell in a range of $300 to $700. Tempting as it may seem, it still has more risks than benefits.

In the long run, you will most likely end up with problematic bills due to large medical expenses. They also don’t employ quality assurances such as medical tests, certifications, and treatments.

I don’t recommend these sources as they pose harm to dogs as well as future owners.

Backyard Breeders

Backyard breeders are another source of Dogo Argentinos. These are breeders who have slight or no experience in raising Argentinos, and only become sources due to unforeseen circumstances.

These situations include unexpected dog pregnancies, causing them to have extra puppies in their homes. Because of being unable to take care of more puppies, they try to sell them off to reduce responsibility.

Prices from these sources range from $700 to $1,000, which are a bit lower than the actual average price.

Yes, their motives might be good, but it still doesn’t change the fact that they are inexperienced. As specialized dogs that require great care especially as puppies, Argentinian Dogos need to have the best upbringing.

I recommend you to not purchase from them as you could also end up spending more money in the future due to pre-ownership neglect.

Reputable Breeders

Reputable breeders are perhaps the best source for Argentinian Dogos. These are breeders who have built a reputation throughout the years because of the quality and authenticity they bring.

They treat puppies with proper food and socialization, which are two important things for a dog’s development. They also include completed papers, medical tests, and certificates to confirm your Dogos health and breed.

Their prices are quite high, ranging from $1,000 to $2,500. They can also offer show/champion line breeds which can reach up to $5000.

However, the price speaks for itself as you will be assured of your pup’s quality in both health and temperament, as well as physical features. For my dog, I purchased it from a reputable breeder for $1800.

Until now, I still find it a good decision since I was not faced with any severe medical problems in my journey as an owner.

Initial Costs of Dogo Argentino Ownership

With the puppy costs displayed above, I’m sure that you are now excited to live a life with your beloved Dogo. Before that, let us first see some other initial payments for items that could come with your new puppy’s arrival.

With the help of my experience as a Dogo owner, I have created a list of the initial items and services which I used in the primary stages.

Item TypeCost
First Bag of Dog Food$60
Full Grooming$30
Initial Pet Insurance Fee$50
Dog License$10
First Vaccination$50
Beds$40
Toys$20
Bowls, Harnesses, and Leash$100
Treats$30
Initial Veterinarian Visit$50
TOTAL COST$440

These values are, of course, dependent on your preferences. As you learn and grow with your dog, you will be able to determine the most appropriate budget. The costs on the list are rounded to the nearest tens to serve as a guide or benchmark.

My First Year Expenses as an Argentinian Dogo Owner

Aside from the preliminary costs of puppy purchases and some one-time purchase items, there is also what we call the annual maintenance cost for your Dogo. Again, I provided a list of the total estimated first-year expenses.

Annual expenses are significantly higher in the first year due to the items you need for your Dogo. As time goes by, this yearly cost will decrease since it will be up to you whether you want to replace those items or not.

If you got your puppy from a reputable breeder, you could really save up from medical expenses other than insurance as your dog will most likely be free from diseases.

Item TypeCost
Dogo Argentino Puppy$1,800
Vet Check$140
Pet Insurance$160
Dog License$10
Obedience Classes$200
Doggie Items (Toys, Bed, Leash, Collars, Shampoos) $250
Vaccinations$100
Flea, Tick, and Deworming$80
Treats$300
Food$720
TOTAL COST$3,720

As you can see, the cost of the puppy took up most of the first-year expenses. Because of this, you need to consider your source greatly.

Here are the adjustments you can make as owners to lower your costs:

Avoiding obedience classes – Obedience training for Argentinian Dogos is optional, but it is highly recommended. At a young age, these dogs need to be exposed to proper socialization or else you could run into some problems.

Obedience training helps them to be more friendly to kids as well as other small animals, shutting off unnecessary predatory instincts. It could also help suppress hyperactivity as they will be taught with discipline.

Dogos are extremely receptive to training sessions, and this can yield great results even for a short time. Most classes range from $50 to $100 a day, but they are definitely worth the price.

Lessening on treats – I love feeding my Dogo treats, especially after a command or trick. Treats help my dog to be more responsive to me.

To save up, we can opt to cut our dog’s treat consumption, or even go for cheaper ones. Personally, I love giving my Dogo the best I could offer, so I am pretty generous to him when it comes to treats.

Cheaper pet insurance programs – For my Dogo’s insurance, I chose a package worth $160. The package included tick and worm removal, so I thought that it was fit for my dog and me.

The initial payment was $50 with a monthly fee of $10. You could go for a higher costing insurance program, as it will depend on your preference.

Monthly Cost of Owning a Dogo Argentino

From the seemingly high initial payments, my Dogo’s monthly maintenance lessened. As time went by, I was only faced with costs on food, insurance, and treats.

Here are the monthly expenses for my Dogo:

Item TypeCost
High-quality Dog Food$50
Insurance Monthly Fee$10
Treats$60
TOTAL COST$120

Argentinian Dogos have a tank-like appearance because of their large, muscular build. For this reason, they have very high food consumption rates to make-up for their muscle mass.

Dogos, especially puppies, eat up to 4-6 times a day. This process causes their food stocks to easily disappear without a trace. My Dogo loves protein-based products to restore energy because of his tendency to run around.

I did not make use of outdoor grooming services for my Dogo. They shed at average rates, so one or two brushes per week is enough.

If it’s shedding season, then there might be a need for a daily brush routine to avoid hair in your furniture or carpets.

General cleaning with a bath once a month is enough, except when he gets dirty due to playing. As for the nails, you can clip them yourself.

For the ears, cotton and cleaner will do the trick. Keep in mind that Argentinian Dogos dogs are easy to maintain.

A contingency plan for your mastiff is always a good idea. With funds like this, you will be prepared for unexpected stuff such as running out of food or even accidents.

In my experience, I wasn’t able to use these funds that much, as my Dogo was incredibly healthy, thanks also to my breeder’s efforts. A monthly portion of $20 is enough for a good emergency fund, but I did not include it on my list anymore.

Additional Expenses

There are some additional expenses that your dog could use growing up. I did not include these in the list, but you could make use of them in the future.

Dog day care services – As hunting dogs which require different sets up exercise throughout the day, it is necessary for them to have a companion.

Dog day care is a good alternative if you can’t attend to your dog’s physical needs. However, leaving your dog with someone else requires trust in the caretaker. Make sure to tap on someone you know of, or someone familiar with your Dogo.

Travel and shipping fees – In my experience, I found that most Argentino owners get their purebred Dogos outside of America. They could be in countries such as Portugal or Argentina.

Because of the distance, some of my friends were required to travel or cover for the breeder’s expenses used in traveling with the pup.

Always double-check for the breeder’s identity, as well as integrity, since distance puts some challenges in breeder-owner relationships. Negotiate properly in shipping terms since it could cost an owner as much as $500.

Finding Products for Your Dogo Argentino

To find the best product for you Dogo, you must get items that are created specifically for the breed. You must consider a Dogo’s high energy levels and hunting reputation to maximize efficiency.

Here are the common Dogo items which I initially bought for my puppy:

  • Collars
  • Food and water bowls
  • Interactive and durable toys
  • Crate and bed
  • Grooming tools
  • Quality food

Over the years, I have gathered the best websites for Dogo Argentino food, products, and toys. Below is the list of sites I use for my mastiff’s comfort, as well as his all-time favorites.

Food

Argentinos are known to be not picky with their food. They would eat almost anything you feed them. However, their build demands the proper food for them especially as pups.

Pawster.comOpens in a new tab. offers the best food products for your Dogo Argentino to sustain them throughout the day. The site recommends a protein-based product to sustain your Dogo’s energy needs.

They tend to run around, so the more protein the food has, the better. Putting in some fat in their diet is also suggested; as they use it for hormone production. Lastly, some carbs and essential vitamins should keep a balanced diet for them.

My Dogo seems to love the Taste of the Wild High Prairie Grain-Free Dry Dog Food which is a balanced meal containing buffalo meat and some vegetables.

It is only priced at $50 per bag, making it an overall good deal for owners. Remember to keep stocks as Dogos could get hungry anytime!

Items

Dogo Argentinos are avid chewers, so this is an aspect you should look at. When buying products for your puppy, always go for durable and flexible products so you won’t end up buying the item again. Amazon offers plenty of good products made specially for Dogos.

I recommend never putting Dogos in chains as it could hurt them. For leashes and collars, I usually buy cotton or leather-based ones for comfort. I also bought a harness for my Dogo to protect his build.

The Dogo Argentino’s harness priced at $25 to $45 proved to be effective for my dog, combined with padded leashes which only costs $10 or less.

Any blanket or soft bed for Dogos is good since they can sleep anywhere. They are non-destructive dogs, so there will be a lesser need for ultra-strong blankets or beds.

Most owners recommend the crate train your pup at an early age as it has its own benefits. It serves as your dog’s bedroom and personal space. Most crates, such as the MidWest Homes for Pets could cost up to $85, but there are always cheaper alternatives.

For toys, my Dogo loves the Benebone Real Flavor Dental Dog Chew Toy. It is a very good chewing toy that considers my dog’s teeth, and it stimulates him well.

Furthermore, it has flavor imbued which means that they will be more attracted to chewing it. It’s only priced at $10 to $20, which is pretty good considering its benefits.

Treats

Treats can be used to train, reward, or build connections with your puppy. When buying one, it is important to get products that are all-natural and with minimal sugar. DoggyDogWorldOpens in a new tab. is a site that provides the best treats recommendations for your Dogo.

My Dogo’s personal favorite is the Cloud Star Chewy Liver Tricky trainers which are low calorie treats made with natural ingredients.

These treats have a soft feel to them, making it suitable for very bitey dogs such as this breed. This only costs for $12 to $15 per bag but remember to always stock up because Dogos simply love it.

Final Thoughts

Our future pets deserve all the love we could give. By having these lists and estimates at your disposal, you will have a glimpse of you and your Dogo’s future. Enjoy your journey as an Argentino owner as I did with mine!

John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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