How Much Does a Cane Corso Cost? Puppy Prices & Expenses

Cane Corso lying on the grass

When I got my Cane Corso dog, I didn’t know what I was getting into. I was fascinated by the breed and desperately wanted one. Well, now I do have one, and I know precisely the typical expenses one will accrue as an owner of this majestic breed. But let us start with the basics – price.

So how much does a Cane Corso puppy cost? A Cane Corso puppy will cost between $1,500 and $3,000 on average. Cane Corsos from a reputable breeder will cost around $2,000, but prices may rise as high as $6,000 for show quality dogs.

The Average Cost of a Cane Corso Puppy

One thing you should understand about the Cane Corso breed is that they are expensive to purchase and expensive to maintain. A Cane Corso pup will cost between $1,000 and $1,800. This price is for a puppy that has a good lineage and health checks but is not of a high enough standard.

Generally, show quality puppies are sold for $2,300 to $6,000. So, you have to be conscious of the price a breeder tells you because that will tell you the quality of the puppy he’s selling.

If on the off chance you find Cane Corso puppies below the price of $1,000, you must refrain from purchasing such puppy. You want to buy a puppy of a high standard and the best quality if you’re going to enjoy your time as a dog owner.

A puppy that costs above $3,000 usually has a superior pedigree which makes them so expensive. A pedigree is a solid proof that the puppy comes from an excellent line and is purebred. A breeder will usually pay more to use a male dog with show level pedigree.

Also, if you’re not interested in getting a puppy, you could opt for an adult Cane Corso. This usually costs between $250 to $500, which is by far the cheapest means of getting a Cane Corso dog.

Finding reputable breeders should be your number one priority when searching for a place to buy your Cane Corso pup. There are courses online and articles that will help you spot the type of breeders that you must avoid.

There are several reasons why some puppies will be more expensive than some. Some of the factors that affect Cane Corso price are:

  • Age: Cane Corso puppies are usually the most expensive when they are between 8 and 12 weeks old. This is the perfect time for buying puppies, and it’s the time when breeders will sell at the highest prices. A breeder who doesn’t sell his puppies in this 8 to 12 weeks window usually lower their prices. And when a puppy gets to one year, its price dramatically reduces.
  • Lineage and Bloodline: The bloodline and lineage of a puppy impact their price. If a puppy comes from a show winning bloodline, the price will be more (make sure the breeder can provide proof). Show dogs usually have excellent temperaments. But to be fair, many breeders who do not specialize in breeding show quality dogs still have great puppies with exceptional personalities.
  • Coat Color: Cane Corsos often come in certain colors; grey, black, red, brindle, and fawn. Most of these colors are acceptable within the Cane Corso breed standard, but once in a while, you’ll find puppies that have coat colors that are not accepted within the breed standard, for instance, ‘blues.’ These pups are slightly cheaper than the puppies with the traditional coat colors.
  • Breeder Reputation and Practises: Some breeders have an excellent reputation for breeding quality puppies. Such breeders will charge more for their puppies. And if they are known to have produced show winning dogs, they are more sought after and sell their puppies for more. Also, breeders who are registered with the American Kennel Club are held to certain standards. So, their welfare practices are top-notch, and that also affects their prices.
  • Kennel Club Papers: Puppies that are certified by respected and accredited Kennel clubs usually cost more. For instance, registration under the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) or the American Kennel Club (AKC) increases their price. However, if the parents of a pup are registered and the puppy itself is not, the price will not be as high.
  • Disease Testing: If the puppy has been tested for diseases that are common within the Cane Corse breed, such as hip dysplasia, eye problems, gastric torsion, and Demodex mange, it will increase its costs.
  • Vaccines: Most reputable breeders only offer their puppies for sale after being vaccinated (at least the first round). Doing this often increases the cost of the puppy.
  • Tail Docking and Dew Claw Removal: These practices are very common for most breeders. Some breeders automatically perform these procedures on their puppies unless a customer instructs them otherwise. If the puppy has already undergone these procedures, it will cost more.

Types of Cane Corso Breeders: What Are Their Prices?

Technically speaking, anyone can breed a dog. With the resources, the average person can take up the breeding and succeed in doing it. But the fact is, not everyone should be a breeder.

There are typically three types of breeders, and of all of them, only one is classified as the best. The class of breeder you get your puppy from is the most significant factor affecting its price.

Puppy Mills

Apart from adoption, puppy mills are the go-to places for getting cheap dogs. Puppy mills are usually referred to as commercial breeders. Their primary motive is generating income, so they give little or no care about quality.

Puppies that are bred at these kinds of facilities are often shipped to pet stores all over the country, or sold to people directly via newspapers and online ads.

When the puppies are old enough to be sold, they are cleaned up and sent to pet stores or buyers. The breeding dogs, however, never catches a break. They are kept at the mill to produce litter after litter in the worst possible conditions.

As a result of these inhumane conditions, dogs bought from puppy mills are commonly found to have certain health issues. Examples include heart disease, epilepsy, endocrine disorders, deafness, distemper, blood disorders, eye problems, fleas, mange, and lots more. All of these mean high veterinary bills for whoever purchases such dogs.

The average price of Cane Corso puppy from a puppy mill: $400 – $650

Backyard Breeders

Backyard breeders are not to be confused with hobby breeders. Backyard breeders are people who keep a number of dogs (one breed or several breeds) and lets them breed or just breed them deliberately.

They have little or no understanding of the breed or concern about the dog breed standard, health maintenance, genetics, and socialization with other dogs.

Backyard breeders are not into the game to further the integrity of the breed. Most backyard breeders who succeed in the act usually expand and become puppy millers.

Backyard breeders also offer cheap puppies for sale. You should not opt for getting your Cane Corso from a backyard breeder if given a choice.

The average price of a Cane Corso from a backyard breeder: $800 – $1,600

Reputable Cane Corso Breeders

By far, these are the best dog breeders and an excellent source for getting your Cane Corso puppy. Reputable breeders are dedicated to bettering the specific dog breed they are into and does not do it for profit or gain.

They always care about the health and well-being of their puppies and parent dogs. Reputable Cane Corso breeders are honest about the breed’s temperamental and physical traits. They are also informative about the various diseases that the breed is prone to.

Often, a reputable breeder will do a background check on you to make sure their puppies are going to loving homes. And most times, they might even ask you to sign a contract indicating their right to reclaim their dog if you are unable to meet the specified conditions they gave.

The average price of a Cane Corso from a reputable breeder: $2,000 – $3,500

Initial Costs of Cane Corso Ownership

Like I earlier stated, Cane Corsos are not a cheap breed. They come expensive, and they require a lot to care for and maintain them. I know you’re probably excited about starting your journey as a Cane Corso parent.

But before that excitement gets the better of you, you have to know the rough estimate of cash you will be spending as a Cane Corso owner.

I never had anyone do this for me, so I sort of learned on the job. Some expenses were unforeseen, and there is a lot I could have done to avoid them. But you don’t have to go through what I did. I have put together a list of costs I accrued when I first got my Cane Corso.

Type of ExpenseCost
Quality Puppy Food$75
Treats$30
Toys$20
Dog Crate$65
Dog Bed$35
Bowls, Leash, and Other Gear$65
Carpet Cleaner, Waste Bags, and Other Supplies$55
Initial Veterinarian Visit$80
Initial Vaccines$95
Deworming, Flea, and Tick Meds$50
Dog License$20
TOTAL$590

There is so much you stand to gain if you sign up for dog insurance. I never really got one (I’m not sure if I regret it), but the company would cover a lot of the medical-related costs for your puppy.

You can opt for one and have some of the medical bills taken off your shoulders. You never know, it could save thousands of dollars in the future.

My First Year Owning a Cane Corso Puppy

To be frank, my first year as a Cane Corso owner was not easy. Cane Corsos are a sturdy breed, and their expenses are usually more than most dogs. I didn’t anticipate that so I incurred so many expenses and paid for so many mistakes.

Apart from the cost of getting my puppy, there were several smaller expenses I took care of after I became a Cane Corso owner. The good thing is I have a great memory, as I was able to put down every cost I incurred in my first year of living with Cara (my Cane Corso dog).

The good news is that even though you spend the most in your first year, other years will cost you significantly less. So, you just have to suit up because your first year will pack a punch.

A good reason why you should get your puppy from a reputable breeder is your assurance of buying a healthy and stable dog. If your dog is of low quality, the ensuing years might just involve a lot of spending because of medical issues.

I got my dog three years ago at $1,400, which is not the price a Cane Corso will go for from a reputable breeder. The truth is, at the time, I didn’t know a lot of the things I know now.

And if I could go back, I would do a lot of things differently. Although my dog didn’t come as the best quality, she wasn’t the worst either.

With everything I know now, I can say (and I advise you to do the same) that my next Cane Corse will be bought from a reputable breeder. Regardless of how much it would cost me.

Below are all the expenses I incurred in my first year as a Cane Corso owner.

Type of ExpenseCost
Purebred Cane Corso Puppy$1,400
Food$765
Treats$275
Toys$60
Doggie Door, Crates, Leash, Bowls, Waste Bags, etc$465
Ear Cropping$450
Vaccines$450
Flea and Tick Medication$210
Deworming$125
Veterinarian Expenses$260
Dog License$20
TOTAL$4,480

Like I earlier said, if I could go back to the past, I would do things differently. And some of these things will impact on my general expenses. They include:

  • Buying my Cane Corso puppy from a reputable breeder. Cane Corsos from reputable breeders is usually sold between $2,000 and $4,000. Some are even higher. That will add about $1,500 to $2,000 to the cost of buying the puppy.
  • Spend more time on training. For Cane Corso, training is important. This is because they are built initially as guard dogs, and their training must begin during their early years to achieve better results. I didn’t give as much time as I should have to my Cara, but that will be different with my next dog. And more training comes with more need for treats. That will add about an additional $70 for the year.

From the table, you can see I spent a considerable amount of money during the first year. I like to believe that I could have cut a lot of costs if I had taken up a dog insurance plan. That way, I would have saved up the cash I spent on vaccines, deworming, and most of the veterinary visits I made.

As I said, my puppy did not come from a reputable breeder, so I did not enjoy some benefits I would have if I had purchased from one. I had to do a lot of health checks, and the regular visit to the vet added too much to my expenses.

Also, ear cropping my Cara was pretty expensive but within range. It was a painful experience for her, but I am glad we went through with it.

Monthly Cost of Owning an Adult Cane Corso

Seeing a whole year’s worth of expenses might scare some persons (I understand). Maybe if we limit the spending to monthly costs, it will help.

Like I said earlier, the first year of owning a Cane Corso is more expensive than the ensuing years. This is because there are expenses that you just need to do it once during the first year and never again.

Your monthly expenses after the first year will be smooth sailing and friendlier on your pocket, so don’t fret. Here are the expenses you are likely to accrue each of month of your Cane Corso ownership.

Type of ExpenseCost
Food$75
Treats$35
Toys$5
Health Insurance$0
Miscellaneous Supplies$20
Medications$30
TOTAL$165

The above is what I usually spend on Cara every month for the years I’ve owned her. However, there was a rare case where I had to spend a lot more, and that was on medical bills. The thing was, my dog got bloated, and it cost me $2,800 to fix her.

I never planned for it, and it wrecked me at the time. So, here’s my advice for you, always make sure to have an emergency fund in the event of cases like this. Anything can happen, so you should keep yourself prepared when unforeseen circumstances hit you.

Lifetime Expenses of Owning a Cane Corso

Everything we have discussed so far does not include the unforeseen costs that might come up due to emergencies. And with all of that, our estimated cost per month of owning a Cane Corso is $165.

The breed usually has a life span of 11 – 12 years, and if we follow our monthly expenses and first-year expenses, that will give us an average estimate of $26,260 for 12 years (if the dog lives to its average lifespan).

It looks like a whole lot, but the purpose of giving you is to help you put things into perspective. But you shouldn’t think about it too much. Breaking it down to monthly expenses will better serve not to scare you off from wanting to own a Cane Corso.

Other Potential Expenses

There are a few other expenses that I didn’t include in my list because they are not necessities. You can choose to pay for these services or simply do them yourself. All of them are within your control to either choose to pay for them or not. These expenses are:

  • Training: As I mentioned earlier, training is vital for Cane Corso. These dogs are affectionate, intelligent, and protective towards their owners, but they can just as well turn on you if the right steps are not taken. Cane Corsos should get training immediately when you bring them home. It is not enough to spend time training them yourself (that is fine too). You may need to sign them up for puppy classes as well. This will cost you around $30 (group classes) to $120 (individual training) per session.
  • Grooming: For Cane Corsos, a lot of grooming is not necessarily required. They shed about twice a year and have short coats which regular brushing can keep them clean and healthy. But they are huge dogs, and you might not have the necessary facilities to bathe them, in that case, you will need to hire a professional groomer. Groomers can come in once every couple of months and help with the physical care of your dog. Getting a groomer will cost about $50 per session.
  • Day Care or Pet walking Services: If you’re not the work from home type, that means you have to leave your dog alone for hours on a stretch. This might be okay for some persons but will leave other persons nervous. To avoid leaving your dog alone at home, you can register your dog in a daycare, and you can drop him off every day on your way to work. Pet walking services might be required if and when you can’t find time to walk or exercise your dog. Both services can cost between $20 – $50 per day.
  • Ear Cropping: Only very few breeders crop the ears of their puppies before selling them out. The ones who do not crop the ears of their puppies will leave the job for the new owners which means that you will have to pay for it. Cropping your Cane Corso’s ear will cost between $200 and $600.
  • Insurance: Cane Corsos are considered one of the most expensive dog breeds to insure. This is mainly as a result of their large size. The minimum cost of insuring a Cane Corso is $100 per month. You should do some research on this before proceeding because some companies do not cover this breed.
  • Kennel Club Registration: All dogs from reputable breeders come with registration papers. But if you get your dog from another breeder who did not issue you the papers, you might need to do it yourself. The best kennel club to get this is the AKC (American Kennel Club)Opens in a new tab. for American citizens and the CKC (Canadian Kennel Club)Opens in a new tab. for Canadians. This will cost about $40.

Finding a Cheaper Cane Corso

If you feel that the cost of getting a Cane Corso is too much for you, there are other options you could opt for.

There are Cane Corso rescue centers that specially find, rehabilitate, and care for homeless Cane Corso dogs. You can visit one or find their websites online, such as Cane Corse Association of America – Rescue where you can pay very little to get a Cane Corso.

You can also find adult Cane Corsos on pet adoption websites. These options work pretty well for families without kids, especially when you cannot account for the dog’s background.

This is because bringing a dog home to a house full of kids without knowing its history with former owners is very risky. Adoption fees can cost anywhere between $200 and $400.

Sometimes, people tend to relocate and choose to do so without their dogs. Getting a Cane Corso this way will be cheaper also, and most times it will mean lesser expenses for you because the family would have taken care of most of the one-off expenses.

How to Find Products That Work for Cane Corsos

The Cane Corso is a working dog and a majestic breed. There are many regular products that would work for most dogs but won’t cut it for a Cane Corso, so you must know what is needed precisely.

When getting a collar, a thick leather or nylon collar will allow you to have some control over the dog. For their large size, when they get hostile, collars with these materials will do. You should be particular about which harness to use on them during walks.

Cane Corsos require crate training whey they are still puppies. This is to establish territorial dominance between you and them. These dogs grow quickly so you will need to purchase two crates; one for when it’s a puppy and the other for when it gets to 6 to 8 months old. Any comfortable bed will do for them.

Also, your Cane Corso might or might not enjoy toys. But you won’t know its preference till you conduct a test. You can do this by leaving them a chew toy when they are puppies. If they start to play with it and chew it, then your dog definitely has a thing for toys.

After you have discovered its attitude toward toys, you can go on to buy more. The toys that will work are; squeaky balls, rawhide, and rubber bones. Avoid getting them soft toys because they will chew them up in no time.

My Final Thoughts

Cane Corsos are great dogs, but they should not be the choice for people who have never owned a dog. They are very powerful and need an experienced person to make them fit for household living.

If this is not you, maybe you should consider going for another breed. And if you are sure you are capable of handling this noble dog, then prepare for the enormous responsibility that comes with it.

To save you a lot of money, you should purchase your dog from a reputable breeder. Try as much as you can to avoid the temptation of looking for breeders who will sell for cheap.

As you have gotten a general idea of the expenses involved in owning a Cane Corso, you should now be able to make an informed decision about bringing one of these dogs into your home. I wish you the best of luck.

John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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