English Bulldog Price: How Much Does an English Bulldog Cost?

English Bulldog puppies running outdoors

After you have decided that English Bulldogs are more suitable for your taste and lifestyle than their French cousins, your next goal is to find local breeders and estimate their initial cost. You also have to assess whether you will be able to provide for their needs in the long run.

To help you with this intimidating task, I prepared this in-depth guide about English Bulldog price and the monthly, yearly, and lifetime expenses of owning them. I also discussed other potential costs that you should be aware of.

If you find this guide useful, bookmark and share this with your friends who are also considering English Bulldogs as their next canine companion.

How Much Does an English Bulldog Cost?

English Bulldog puppies cost around $1,500 to $4,500. This is pretty much similar to that of the French Bulldog, but they can also be a little bit pricey if they come from a champion bloodline. Expect to pay $2,500 to $9,000 if you are after their premium varieties.

Below is a comprehensive list of factors that affect the pricing of an English Bulldog. I decided to include them in this guide so you’ll be more aware of where your money goes.

  • Ancestry or Lineage: One of the top reasons why some English Bulldogs are more expensive than others is because they came from champion bloodlines. By this, I mean that their parents have joined conformation or agility competitions and have been tagged as excellent in both fields. They carry certain traits that make them stand out among other dogs of the same breed.
  • Breeder’s Reputation: If the breeder you are planning to buy your puppy from has built an impressive reputation among canine circles, the chances are the dogs he’s advertising are much pricier compared to other local breeders you’ll consult. Don’t get alarmed or doubtful if this is the case. It is their right to charge more for their dogs especially if they have produced pups who won several competitions.
  • Social Trends: The demand for English Bulldogs has significantly risen in the past few years which is why they are now twice the price of the famous Labrador Retrievers. In fact, they are currently ranked 5th on the American Kennel Club (AKC) breed popularity ranking.
  • Gender: Female English Bulldogs are often pricier than males because of their breeding potential. Female pups can generate revenue for their owner throughout their life span by producing several healthy litters. If this isn’t one of your goals in buying your dog, better choose a male puppy because they are slightly cheaper.

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  • Training Received: Even before your dog is handed to you by the breeder, they have probably received proper obedience training from a professional. If this is so, you will be charged for the training fee that the breeder initially shouldered. This is a worthy price to pay because your dog will be able to easily adapt to different environments and social situations.
  • Location of Purchase/Shipping: Some pet owners prefer to buy their dog overseas or from a different region, especially if the breeders from those areas are highly recommended. This leads to a good chunk of money spent on shipping costs. Do not expect the breeder to send you the puppy without charging you any shipping fee because it is quite expensive on their part.
  • Disease Testing: The breeder will be presenting you with a number of health certificates that were acquired through having your dog undergo specific tests. Most of these examinations are expensive, but they are worth their price. You will be assured that the Bulldog you’re bringing home doesn’t have any hidden health issues.
  • Vaccination: According to Prestige Animal Hospital, there are four core vaccines that an English Bulldog should get. These are for canine parvovirus, canine distemper, hepatitis, and rabies. All of these aren’t exactly cheap so the price is added to the cost of the pup.
  • Current Economy in the Region: This is a no-brainer, but I’m still going to include this here. If the economy in the area where you are living is progressive, everything is more expensive. This also applies to the costs of dogs. That’s why you’ll probably observe that English Bulldogs are more expensive in New York than Delaware.

RELATED:
How Much Is a French Bulldog Puppy? A Full Cost & Price Breakdown

The Average English Bulldog Puppy Price From Three Different Types of Breeders

English Bulldog puppy price costs and expenses

You probably did your research and surveyed several breeders before arriving at this article. I understand that you’re a wee bit confused because the average prices of English Bulldog vary from one seller to another.

This is because there are actually three types of dog breeders out there and the price of their pups depends on how they produced them. Below is an exact review of the English Bulldog breeders I’m talking about.

Professional or Reputable Breeders

Professional breeders should be your go-to if you want to own a healthy, high-quality dog. They are experts in dog production and they ensure that their breeding stock is tested for various diseases before they are mated.

Here are some signs that the breeder you found is to be trusted:

  • They would want to meet you in person to assess if you are ready to own a dog.
  • They will bombard you with questions to see if English Bulldogs are fit for your lifestyle and preferences.
  • They would readily show you the parents of the litter you are choosing from.
  • There aren’t many breeds in their facility because they only focus on a single or only a few breeds.
  • You need to wait before you can get your pup because they do not overbreed their female dogs.
  • Your dog’s parents were screened for potential health issues that they may pass on to their offspring.
  • The breeder won’t give you the pup until they are eight weeks old to ensure that they were given ample time to socialize with their mother and littermates.
  • You were provided with your dog’s full veterinary records.
  • Your dog comes with a lifetime guarantee. In other words, the breeder will still remain accountable to your pet even after you bring them home.

The average price of an English Bulldog from a professional breeder is around $1,500 to $4,500. This may still vary depending on the lineage of the pup you are interested in buying. Usually, dogs from champion bloodlines range from $2,500 to $9,000.

Watch this video to find out the top 10 things you need to know before buying an English Bulldog:

Top 10 Things To Know Before Buying an English Bulldog

Backyard Breeders

I won’t 100% suggest that you buy from backyard breeders because most of them aren’t trained professionally. Some are even clueless about the etiquette of dog breeding and are only producing pups for the sole purpose of gaining profit.

Here are some signs that you are dealing with one:

  • They do not screen their buyers and directly proceed with asking for deposits.
  • They advertise their dogs on eBay, Craigslist, and pet stores instead of having their own website, which features some other useful information about the breed.
  • They do not offer lifetime guarantees, so if a certain defect appears as the dog matures, they will no longer be held accountable.
  • They cannot provide you with proof that the parents of their litters are genetically tested for potential diseases.
  • They don’t have any type of return policy.
  • They cannot present veterinary records to prove that your dog has undergone de-worming, vaccination, and other essential disease preventive measures.
  • They let you take home the dog even before they turn 8 weeks old, so they are not properly socialized.
  • They won’t allow you to see your puppy’s parents as well as the facility where they are keeping their dogs.
  • They don’t run out of puppies to sell because they overbreed.
  • They seem clueless when you ask specific questions about the breed.

If you decide to buy from a backyard breeder, proceed with caution and make sure that you aren’t being taken advantage of. There may be some of them who are almost similar to professional breeders when it comes to taking care of their pups, but you should still be observant and critical.

The average cost of an English Bulldog from a backyard breeder is between $500 to $1,000.

Puppy Mills or Large Commercial Breeders

Here’s the thing, puppy mills do not admit that they are actually breeding for profit and that they do not prioritize the health and quality of the puppies they are producing. They are simply not the best choice if you want to purchase an English Bulldog.

Here’s how you can spot a puppy mill breeder or a dog who came from one:

  • English Bulldog pups from these large scale breeding facilities are unclean. You’ll notice that their coat is of poor quality because they weren’t taught any hygienic habits.
  • The breeder cannot present any papers as evidence that your dog is vaccinated.
  • The breeder won’t meet you at their home. Instead, they would arrange appointments in parking lots, coffee shops, and other places where you won’t have any idea about the unsanitary practices they are using.
  • They won’t allow you to see the parents of your dog. This often happens when you buy a dog from a pet store. The puppies are separated early from their mother and littermates.
  • The facility houses a lot of breeds and most of them are the trendy ones. This means that they are really after profit.
  • Several litters are available because of overbreeding.
  • You are allowed to bring home your puppy even before it turns 8 weeks.
  • The breeder does not assess or ask you a lot of questions regarding your capability to look after a dog.
  • The breeder doesn’t ask you to sign any contract.
  • They don’t offer any health guarantees for their dogs.
  • Puppies are extremely cheap.

The vast majority of English Bulldogs sold in pet stores and internet classifieds came from puppy mills. Yes, they are not as expensive as the ones who came from professional breeders, but they are known to have many health and behavioral issues.

In an article published by Omaha World Herald, a pet owner reported that an English Bulldog she rescued from a puppy mill has suddenly become fearful and charged his sons. This drastic behavioral change is often an outcome of stressful living situations they’ve been through.

If you don’t want to deal with unstable dogs, skip buying from puppy mills even though they only cost $500 to $800.

Initial Cost of English Bulldog Ownership

Three English Bulldog puppies playing

The main reason why professional breeders ask you so many questions before letting you bring home an English Bulldog is that it is quite expensive to take care of one.

Aside from the thousands of dollars you’re going to spend in purchasing them, there are also several items that you need to initially buy so their transition from a kennel facility to your home will be seamless. They are the following:

  • High-Quality Dog Food: There are many types of kibbles available online and at local pet stores near you, but English Bulldogs should be fed only the premium quality which costs around $85. These types of dog food reduce the risk of stomach upsets, diarrhea, and vomiting.
  • Leash and Collar: Other necessary items to buy for your dog are leash and collars. These two will help you in your pup’s training, behavioral correction, and safety during walks. They only cost $20, but they are incredibly functional.
  • Food and Water Bowls: Food and water bowls are usually priced at $11. This is needed to help your English Bulldog eat properly and without any mess.
  • Chew Toys: Chew toys aren’t only for fun. This will also make your dog’s teeth clean and their jaws stronger. If you have a young puppy who’s in the teething phase, this will make their gums feel a bit better. You can purchase this at Amazon at $23.
  • Training Treats: An array of training treats can be bought at $25. If you want to start your dog’s obedience training or have them follow your simple commands at home, you should always have some training treats with you.
  • Dog Crate: Similar to us humans, dogs need to have a safe place inside your home. You need to provide a crate for them to lounge or hide if they want to rest or they aren’t comfortable with your visitors. A good quality dog crate costs $44.
  • Dog Bed: Lying in a dog bed can prevent canine hip dysplasia and some other structural problems. This is a worthy purchase at $40.
  • Dog Brush: Even though English Bulldogs are short-coated, they would still need brushing from time to time. It would be better to have a brush at home which only costs $15.
  • Canine Shampoo: Dog shampoos are not only for long-coated breeds. They are also known to help prevent fleas and itchiness, so your English Bulldog will definitely benefit from them. You can buy high-quality dog shampoos for $10.
  • Urine Cleaner: This item easily removes stains and odor inside your home caused by your dog’s pee. You can buy one for $25 from pet shops near you.
  • Poop Scooper: Dealing with your dog’s waste is not an easy task. You would be needing a poop scooper which costs $20 to make it a bit hassle-free.

That was a lot, isn’t it? Let’s look at their individual costs one more time.

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
High-Quality Dog Food$85
Leash and Collar$20
Food and Water Bowl$11
Chew Toys$23
Training Treats$25
Dog Crate$44
Dog Bed$40
Brush$15
Shampoo$10
Urine Cleaner$25
Poop Scooper$20
Total$318

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First-Year Expenses of Owning an English Bulldog Puppy

To aid you in estimating how much money you need for the first year of owning an English Bulldog, here is a list of some essential expenses you have to prepare for:

  • Insurance: If in case your dog needs to be treated for certain medical conditions, you won’t be restricted by your current financial status if your dog is insured. This costs $240 annually.
  • Vaccinations, Neutering, and Deworming: This should no longer be included in your dog’s annual expense breakdown if you bought your pup from a professional breeder. But in case you don’t, expect to spend $102.
  • Flea and Tick Medication: These preventative medications cost $200, but they are quite useful not only for your dog but also for your housemates who may be allergic to these parasites.
  • Vet Visit: Annual vet visits, along with emergency check-ups, aren’t cheap. Save around $400 from your income because you will surely be needing it for the first year of owning an English Bulldog.
  • Dog License: This is used to track your dog easily in case they are lost. Most municipalities provide an ID tag and a license number for $20.

Check out the table below for the average first-year expenses of English Bulldog ownership including the ones we discussed above.

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
English Bulldog Puppy $2,500 – $9,000
Food$945
Chew Toys$230
Training Treats$300
Insurance$240
Vaccinations, Neutering, and Deworming$102 (None if you bought your pup from a reputable breeder.)
Flea and Tick Medication$200
Vet Visits$400
Dog license$20
Total$4,937 – $11,437

Monthly Cost of Owning an Adult English Bulldog

The initial and first-year expenses I have listed in the former sections are ultimately heavy on the pocket if you aren’t financially prepared to own an English Bulldog. So here’s a list of the monthly expenses of owning an adult pup:

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
Food$85
Treats$25
Toys$23
Health Insurance$20
Flea and Tick Medications$50
Miscellaneous Supplies$10
Total$183

Lifetime Expenses of Owning an English Bulldog

Cute English Bulldog puppy following its mother

The average life expectancy of English Bulldogs is around 8 to 10 years. This will be the basis of the estimated cost I will be discussing in this section.

For the first-year expenses, you will be spending $4,937 to $11,437 inclusive of the puppy. Meanwhile, for the succeeding years, your annual expenses will be around $2,196.

Therefore, it is safe to say that for the 8 to 10 years that you will be accompanied by this dog, you will need $25,349 to $31,201.

Other Potential Expenses

These are some of the unforeseen services that you would probably avail of as the needs arise:

  • Pet Walking Assistance: This applies to pet owners who have a busy lifestyle. You need someone to walk your dog to ensure that they are getting enough exercise. The charge for this service is often $15.
  • Daycare Services: There are times that you would need someone to look after your pet because you have to run an errand or to accomplish something of great importance. Daycare services are meant to help you with this and they ask around $15 for payment.
  • Medical Treatment: The cost of medical treatments vary depending on the severity of your dog’s condition, but usually, they are around $150 to $1,000.
  • Kennel Club Registration: To document your dog’s lineage and join dog shows, you should register your English Bulldog in major kennel clubs that cost $90.
  • Pet Grooming Services: Bulldogs may be easy to manage physically, but you should budget at least $35 for grooming services. You may not know, but these goofy pups may turn dirty while playing.
  • Training: If you want your English Bulldog to be more stable and obedient, you should hire a professional trainer for $100.

Money-Saving Tips for English Bulldog Owners

These tips may not work for everyone, but I’m putting this out here to help you save at least a few dollars.

  • Adopt an English Bulldog from shelters and rescues.
  • Study how you can train them yourself.
  • Always look for great deals in buying their needs. Do not buy expensive stuff that is only a waste of money.
  • Instead of hiring professional groomers, watch videos on youtube and read books on how you can groom them on your own.
  • Find a veterinarian whose service is cheap but professional.

Here’s a video on how to groom your English Bulldog.

How to Groom an English Bulldog - Bailey

Final Thoughts: Are English Bulldogs Worth Their Expensive Price?

English Bulldog ownership is not financially easy even though they are less expensive than their French counterparts.

What I would like to reiterate is that you should buy your pup from a professional or reputable breeder to avoid any additional costs in the long run. Also, if you can, contact rescue facilities near you and try to adopt before considering buying one.

John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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