Fluffy Frenchie: Are Long-Haired French Bulldogs Purebred?

Fluffy Frenchie long haired French Bulldog

Among the breeds who are taking the internet by storm for the past ten years is the Fluffy Frenchie. They are quite a unique Bulldog variety since their hair is medium length and wavy instead of the usual Frenchie coat which is short and dense.

Many breeders and kennels advertise these pups are purebred, but some also believe that this is a ploy and these dogs are crossed with runts. These theories, I must admit, even makes the breed more interesting.

If you want to learn more about this dog out of curiosity or plan to buy one, lucky you! This is probably the best Fluffy Frenchie guide you’ll find on the internet today!

What Is a Fluffy French Bulldog? Do They Really Exist?

Fluffy Frenchies are long-haired Bulldogs who are believed to be hybrids because they look way different from the short-coated variety. They go by two other names in reference to their coat which is “Fluffy French Bulldog” and “Long-haired French Bulldog.”

The origin of this dog confuses pet owners as well as novice breeders because there are two contrasting accounts that explain where they come from. I’ll dig deep into this in the following section so keep your eyes glued to this article.

Meanwhile, watch this video to see how they exactly look like:

"FUTURE" the cutest Full Fluffy French Bulldog Lilac & Tan stud!

Are Fluffy French Bulldogs Purebred?

The quick answer is yes; fluffy Frenchies are purebred. However, you’ll get to encounter three types of breeders with different explanations on where they originated:

  • Profit hungry breeders advertise them as crossbreeds so they can ask for a premium fee. In reality, they don’t have any idea regarding the dog’s genetic makeup.
  • Breeders assert that this dog is purebred because they believe Bulldogs are naturally created with the gene responsible for long hairs, albeit rare.
  • Reputable breeders know that Bulldogs didn’t have the long hair gene when they were first developed, but through time, they may have mated “naturally” with local ratter dogs which produced their long hair.

Let me get to the bottom of this. A fluffy French Bulldog can be purebred as evident in the results of genetic tests done by various companies. These purebred pups may have some ratter dog ancestry; that’s why their hair is long.

Meanwhile, some Frenchies have long hairs not because it is naturally present in their genes but because they were mated purposefully with long-haired breeds like the Pekinese and long-haired Chihuahuas.

If you really want to know if your long-haired French Bulldog is purebred, have them undergo a breed identification test.

What Does the Fluffy French Bulldog Look Like?

Fluffy French Bulldogs have a longer coat than the ones typical for the breed, but it is only medium length. If you imagine a pup whose hair sweeps the floor, you are in for a disappointment.

Usually, their wavy hair appears fluffier on their chest, ears, and mane; that’s why some people can’t believe that they are nothing but Frenchies.

Here are their most common coat colors:

Black Fluffy Frenchie

A black fluffy French Bulldog sports a stunning black coat. They may have white markings on their chest, but they may also be solid black.

Lilac and Fawn Fluffy Frenchie

Lilac and fawn Fluffy Frenchies combine two distinct colors on their coats. They usually have a fawn or isabella base with a tone of lilac or a twice diluted black shade.

Blue and Tan Fluffy Frenchie

A blue and tan fluffy French Bulldog has two noticeable colors on its coat: silvery gray and tan. They may also have some white markings on their body as exemplified in the picture above.

White Fluffy Frenchie

A white fluffy Frenchie is either pure white or has shades of cream on its body. Whatever their dominant color is, they’ll surely stop you in your tracks when you come across them on the streets.

How Big Do Fluffy Frenchies Get When Fully Grown?

The fluffy Frenchie’s full-grown size does not differ much from their short-haired counterparts.

They are generally around 11 to 13 inches tall, but males are a bit heavier and taller than females. Male fluffy Frenchies are typically 20 to 28 pounds, while females are 16 to 24 pounds.

RELATED: Male vs. Female French Bulldog: A Side-by-Side Comparison

Fluffy French Bulldog Coat Genetics

According to the fluffy Frenchie DNA profile of many canine genetic companies, the long-coated French Bulldog possesses the Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF) or the autosomal recessive gene. This is responsible for expressing the two gene codes called short hair (Sh) and long hair (Lh)

If two Frenchies carrying the Lh gene produced an offspring, there is a big chance that the whole litter will be long-haired. Meanwhile, if one of the parents carries the Sh gene, only one puppy from the litter will be a fluffy Frenchie.

Do Kennel Clubs Recognize Fluffy Frenchies?

Even though there are no proven faults associated with fluffy Frenchies, they aren’t recognized by kennel organizations like the American Kennel Club (AKC), Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), and United Kennel Club (UKC).

In fact, these recognizing bodies disqualify other Frenchie coats aside from short and smooth. They do not allow long-haired French Bulldogs to join conformation shows because they do not adhere to the breed’s standards.

It is possible that in the next few years, this type of French Bulldog will finally be acknowledged by kennel organizations. Frenchie enthusiasts are already working on achieving full recognition for this variety.

Are Fluffy French Bulldogs Rare?

If I haven’t included pictures of long-haired French Bulldogs in this post, you’ll probably have a hard time imagining them. That’s because they are not as common as the short-haired French Bulldogs who are even owned by famous personalities.

To put it simply, they are a rare Frenchie type, and they come with an expensive cost.

Fluffy French Bulldog Lifespan and Health Issues: Are Fluffy Frenchie Healthy Dogs?

The life expectancy of fluffy French Bulldogs is between 10 to 12 years. If you want them to reach the maximum year they are supposed to live, make sure that you observe them for signs of the following:

  • Breathing Difficulties: Fluffy Frenchies are flat-faced, so they are more prone to breathing problems. Having said this, you should not expose them to too much sun or put their crate in humid areas of your house.
  • Hip Dysplasia: This affects one in every three fluffy Frenchies. If you noticed that your dog has gone limp on the hind legs, have them undergo hip evaluation because they may be suffering from this.
  • Patella Luxation: Frenchies of any coat type may experience patella dislocation or difficulty extending the knee joint. This will lead to complete lameness if not diagnosed early.
  • Hemivertebrae: This is a skeletal deformity experienced often by Frenchies. Since this causes smashed and damaged nerves, dogs afflicted with this condition experience ataxia and incontinence.
  • Cherry Eye: When a tear gland in your fluffy Frenchie’s third eyelid is inflamed, they will suffer from a cherry eye. It is not that painful, but it will still affect your dog’s vision.
  • Juvenile Cataracts: This condition also interferes with your long-haired Frenchie’s vision. Usually, dogs with a juvenile cataract exhibit problems with the opacity of their eyes so the light does not reach their retina.
  • Entropion: If you notice that your fluffy Frenchie’s eyelids have rolled inward, they are surely experiencing entropion. Often, this creates other eye issues like perforations, corneal ulcers, and vision problems caused by pigment development in your dog’s cornea.
  • Skin Allergies: This is also called allergic dermatitis by vets and is caused by a food allergy, flea, and environmental allergens. Itchy, scabbed, and inflamed skin are the expected manifestation of this issue.
  • Autoimmune Skin Disorders: The cause of this health problem is genetics and environmental pollutants. Dogs usually suffer from the most common autoimmune diseases which are pemphigus complex and bullous pemphigoid.

All of these health issues can be diagnosed early and be treated if you would really devote time and effort to taking care of your dog.

There are hundreds of health tests available these days, and we are fortunate because if we have the resources, our pet companions will stay with us for a very long time.

Fluffy Frenchie Temperament: Do They Make Good Family Dogs?

Fluffy Frenchies are great family dogs despite being stubborn at times. Here are some of the reasons why:

  • They are honest people pleasers so you can train them quickly.
  • They would gladly obey you as long as you gave them rewards and motivations.
  • They are affectionate.
  • They are adaptable to apartment living.
  • They are playful and alert.

While all these behavioral descriptions may sound perfect, I should also mention some factors that may affect your decision to buy a fluffy French Bulldog. Here are they:

  • They are one of those dogs who are prone to separation anxiety. Leaving them for an extended period of time is not suggested.
  • Once they get bored, they resort to destructive behaviors to entertain themselves. If you just bought some pricey furniture for your house, this will be a big problem.

Fluffy French Bulldog Cleaning and Grooming Requirements

Long-haired French Bulldogs need to be washed and brushed more often than the smooth-coated ones since they accumulate more dust and debris in their hair. This also prevents doggy odor and fungal infections which are quite stressful to deal with.

In terms of handling their shedding tendencies, you may use a hound glove or a medium bristle brush.

Aside from the coat grooming requirements I have stated above, you should also clean their facial folds and trim their nails regularly. If you aren’t up to doing this, bring them to a professional groomer. Don’t let them rot inside your home!

How Much Does a Fluffy Frenchie Puppy Cost?

I remember mentioning in passing that long-haired French Bulldogs are way more expensive than the smooth-coated variety. That isn’t a fluff (See what I did there?).

The average price of a male fluffy Frenchie is usually $12,990 to $14,990, while females cost $13,990 to $15,990. These dogs aren’t even from top quality lines, so imagine how much more expensive are those who are of premium quality.

On another note, if we compare this to the price of a short-haired pup, the difference is quite shocking. Frenchies with the Sh gene are only around $1,500 to $3,000.

RELATED: How Much Is a French Bulldog Puppy? A Full Cost & Price Breakdown

Places to Find a Fluffy French Bulldog Puppies for Sale and Adoption

Woah! Look at you considering this expensive furball. If you want to check out some places where you can buy them, just visit the following:

  • AKC Marketplace – I know you’re confused. Why would I suggest the AKC marketplace if they don’t even recognize this Bulldog variety? Well, AKC has a lot of member breeders who may have bred this dog, too, although accidentally. There’s no harm in contacting them.
  • REO Ranch – This farm is located in California, and they do not breed for color or any particular trait. They just happen to have produced pups with Ls genes, so you better check their page.
  • Frenchie World – This kennel facility prioritizes the health of their dogs over conformations. They’ll present to you the vet evaluations and other papers related to your dog’s health without you even asking.
  • Fluffy Frenchies UK – This is run by breeders based in Berkshire. The bloodlines of their pup are tested, and each comes with a pedigree paper.

Your chances of adopting a Fluffy Frenchie is slim, but there’s no harm in visiting a few rescues to check if they have one in their care. Here are the top French Bulldog rescues you can contact:

  • French Bulldog Rescue Network – This rescue aims to rehabilitate and rehome Frenchies from puppy mills, import brokers, and pet owners. Behind the organization are a bunch of volunteers you can talk to if you want to adopt.
  • French Bulldog Village Rescue – This is a non-profit organization that fosters and rehabilitates French Bulldogs and its mixes. You can review their adoption process on their website in case you want to take your chances.
  • For The Love Of Our Frenchies – Commonly known by the acronym FLOOF, this rescue is UK based and run by volunteers. What’s best about them is that each of their dogs’ status is posted on their social media pages.
  • Chicago French Bulldog Rescue – This rescue is launched with the goal to protect Frenchies from abusive owners. They are currently running through donations and are very willing to have their dogs adopted.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can Fluffy French Bulldogs Swim?

Nope. This dog cannot swim similar to their short-haired cousin. Their short snouts and stature prevent them from swimming as well as their short legs. They easily tire and can’t keep their nose out of the water.

Are Fluffy Frenchies Amenable to Air Travel?

Most airlines do not allow Frenchies to travel, whether short or long-haired, because they are prone to breathing problems. They may experience difficulty once the plane reaches a relatively high altitude.

Do Fluffy Frenchies Bark a Lot?

Fluffy Frenchies are not big barkers. They are more of the laid back kind of dogs who only communicate through yaps and some other cute noises. You won’t have any problem if you have a neighbor who doesn’t want to be disturbed.

Final Thoughts

Before you dismiss the idea of buying a fluffy Frenchie because of their price, look at the pros of owning one. They are unique looking, they can live with a large family, and you can bring them to your apartment since they can quickly adapt to city life.

I hope that you purchase one from a reputable breeder and not just from hobbyists or puppy mills to avoid spending too much on vet bills. The last thing you need from buying an expensive dog is to pay a considerable amount of money because it has too many health issues.

John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially cats and dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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