Can Siberian Huskies Chew on Bones? A Guide for Husky Owners

Can Siberian Huskies Chew on Bones?

Chewing on bones is one of the most popular activities of dogs. We can see it being portrayed on media, however, whether it is safe for a Siberian Husky to chew on a bone. This is a common question asked by many Husky owners and I’ve done a lot of research to answer this question.

Siberian Huskies can chew on raw bones. They cannot chew on cooked bones safely because cooked bones are brittle and can break or splinter when chewed on, which can cause harm to your Husky. However, they can chew on manufactured or raw bones if these are large enough to prevent accidental inhalation or choking.

Although it looks like bones are perfectly harmless for your Siberian Husky, you need to make sure that bones you give them are safe. If you want to learn about the right bones to give to your Husky, keep reading.

Can Bones Harm Your Siberian Huskies?

Huskies are big dogs, and if you want to feed those bones, then it should be the right one. Otherwise, the wrong type of bone can be very harmful to your dog. The most common problem with the wrong kind of bone is that dogs can swallow the bone parts and choke on.

The most common problems an inadequate bone can cause to your Husky are:

  • Internal bleeding by sharp parts of bones
  • Peritonitis
  • Their teeth can break if the bone is too hard
  • Mouth or tongue injuries
  • Bones can be stuck in their throat
  • They can injure their body parts like eyes

Dogs, as big as Huskies, require continuous care if they are playing with small bone toys. There are a lot of reported accidents in the past where dogs’ death is caused by swallowing the toys.

Bones That Should Never Be Given to Siberian Huskies

If the right types of bones are chosen, they can be very beneficial for your Husky. If you do not pick the correct kind of bone, it could have very harmful effects on your dog, even life-threatening consequences. As discussed in the beginning, you should never give cooked bones to your Husky. 

Many dog owners have some sort of meat for the meal (such as pork, chicken, or steak). Once they have finished the meal, they throw the leftover bones to their dogs. This may look like a tasty treat for your dog, but it is not okay.

Cooked bones are hazardous for Siberian Huskies. Once bones are cooked, they become very brittle and easy to break. Huskies trying to chew cooked bones might end up swallowing the broken part of the bone, which can be stuck in their throat.

These broken parts of bones are sharp pieces that cannot only cup up to their mouth but also puncture essential organs like stomach and intestines. This can be life-threatening for your dog. It is difficult to tell that such a thing has happened because it is not visible.

Another most dangerous aspect regarding cooked bones is that they can easily break the teeth of your Husky. Cooked bones are not as rubbery as those that have not been cooked. So, if your Husky cannot break the cooked bones, the chances are high that bones will break their teeth.

Similarly, smaller size bones offer some challenges for Huskies as well. These are large dogs, which makes it easier for them to choke on stuck things. Husky owners need to make sure that bones they are feeding to their dog are not small enough for them to choke on. 

The general rule of thumb is that the bone should not be more significant than the snout of the dog. Similarly, avoid feeding them poultry bones of any kind.

Poultry bones are much smaller and have choking hazards for your Husky. To make them very dangerous regardless of their cooked or uncooked aspect.

Bones That Are Safe for Your Siberian Huskies

Certain bones can be dangerous for your Husky, but not all bones are bad. Some safe bones have very good health benefits for dogs. The confusion occurs while deciding which ones are not safe and which ones are.

Some safe bones for Siberian Huskies are:

1. Manufactured Bones

You can find these bones in pet stores, who sell manufactured bones specifically for dogs. Make sure that they are large enough not to be choked on and safe for your Husky.

Bones labeled with “for big dogs” are highly recommended. There are different flavors available in manufactured bones so your dog can enjoy the desired flavor.

2. Raw Bones

This type of bone is very much safe for your Husky. Bones have a very rubbery texture before they are cooked, which makes it so bend rather than break.

This way, your dog can hold up the bone better. If these raw bones do end up breaking, they usually do not have the sharp edges as cooked bones, which reduces the chances of puncturing or scraping.

Raw bones are also safe for young Huskies because puppy teeth have physical and psychological needs to chew. Raw bones provide essential nutrients like proteins, fat, minerals, phosphorous, and calcium to your dog. 

It also provides dental health benefits to your Husky. It keeps the dog engaged, and it’s a fun activity for Siberian Huskies. 

3. Edible Dental Bones

You can also find an alternative to raw bones, i.e., edible dental bones. These are easily available in the pet stores. This bone is very safe for your Husky and provides health benefits as well.

These edible bones can help your dog to control tartar and plaque on the teeth. It provides the same experience as the raw bones provide; therefore, you do not need to worry about the mood of your Husky because the dog is going to love it.

4. Rawhide Bones

Rawhide bones come from the inner layer of the cow or horsehide. While manufacturing, the hides are cleaned and ground. After that, they are pressed into chewable dog treats of different sizes and shapes.

These bones are sold at almost every pet store. These are primarily made out of stiff leather. Rawhide bones are very soft and safe for your Husky to swallow. These bones can get a little gross and messy, however nevertheless, very safe for your dog.

However, dog lovers can argue that it is not real bone and contain artificial sweeteners and preservatives. IF your dog is sensitive towards the artificial ingredients, then it can be toxic for him. These bones might cause some problems in the digestive system.

You must consult with the vet before feeding this bone to your Husky. After the approval of the vet, it is safe to feed rawhide to the Husky.

5. Antlers

Antlers are perfect dog chews because of its hardness and bony material. They are long-lasting, not smelly, and enjoyable to Huskies. Huskies love the taste of antlers, plus it provides health benefits. 

Some pet stores sell deer antlers as a chew treat for dogs. This is a very safe bone for your Husky. They contain many nutrients in the middle that are very beneficial for your dog. 

Although antlers are very safe, you still have to keep a close eye on your Husky because there are some reported cases of dogs choked on antlers.

Health Benefits of Bones for Siberian Huskies

If you are giving feeding the right type of bones to your Husky that is trusted and safe, then your dog is going to receive many health benefits from it.

Bones are a good source of mineral and nutrients for your dog because they are made up of calcium. Chewing on the right type of bones can have a very positive effect on its overall health.

The most significant benefit of letting your dog chew on bones is that they can provide essential nutrients. Husky is a meat-eater, therefore chewing on a bone is a great way to give it a treat during training, which is also very beneficial for Husky’s health.

Chewing on bones also provides them an opportunity to keep the teeth clean and sharp. It can reduce plaque buildup on their teeth and help to build stronger teeth to chew on even harder things.

Siberian Huskies are very energetic dogs. Whenever you show them bones, they are thrilled with excitement. They will put the bones into their mouth immediately and start chewing it. This provides a good opportunity for jaw exercise.

Another main benefit of letting your dog chew on bones is that it can help in relieving anxiety and stress within the dog. Chewing on bones is a natural behavior for dogs. Whenever the dogs are left alone, they will start to chew things up because feeling alone is an anxiety-inducing situation for the dog.

At What Age Should You Give Your Husky Bones?

As discussed earlier, bones provide essential nutrients to your Husky. But these benefits are for adult Huskies, and not necessarily ideal for younger Huskies. Bones should only be given to Husky puppies with great care.

The recommended age for Huskies at which they should be allowed to chew on bones is around 8 months to 12 months. The best way to judge whether your Husky is ready or not to chew bone is to check their adult teeth. 

Puppies have small and fragile teeth which can easily break by chewing hard things. Also, they are not as mature mentally and physically, which can cause choking hazards way more severe. Puppies tend to eat whatever fits in their mouth; eight continuous care is required.

When Husky puppies are teething, it is quite reasonable for them to chew on things, and bones are not a good option for them. You should provide the with other safer options like soft or chew toys.

My Final Thoughts

Huskies chew on things because it is their instinct. Chewing on things is one of the ways to release anxiety and stress. It provides them an opportunity to alleviate their extra energy. Letting them chew on bones is a great way to let them intake essential nutrients.

You have to choose the right type of bone because all bones are not equally good for Huskies. If a wrong type of bone is selected, it can be life-threatening for your dog. Give them an uncooked and a big bone.

Husky puppies are small, and their physical development is still in process. It makes the bones very harmful to them. Because they do not have teeth strong enough to chew on harder things, also there is a chance that puppies will choke on to bones. If at all you have to give them a bone, make sure that it is big and soft enough for them.

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John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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