How Much Does a Corgi Cost? Puppy Prices and Expenses

Group of Corgi puppies for sale prices and expenses

In an age where everyone is influenced by what they see on the internet, it is already expected that most of our purchases are based on our favorite icons. This is also true for pet lovers who buy dogs because they are owned by famous people.

One of the best examples of this accidental marketing is when it was publicized that Queen Elizabeth II owns a number of Corgis. The breed was then labeled as the royal dog which dramatically increased its demand.

We all know what happened next! They became more expensive as compared to other purebreds.

If you are a Corgi fancier interested in knowing how much it costs to own one, this article is for you. Not only will you learn about their initial cost, but also how much you’re going to spend in providing their needs in the long run.

How Much Does a Corgi Puppy Cost?

The average cost of a Pembroke Welsh Corgi and a Cardigan Welsh Corgi from a reputable breeder is around $1,000 to $2,500. Of course, puppies who came from champion bloodlines are way more expensive. They may cost $2,600 and above.

You may be confused as to what bloodline I am talking about. Well, this is just one of the six most common factors that affect the pricing of a Corgi. They are all listed down below in full detail.

  • Breeder’s Reputation: Some breeders have gained a better reputation than others after producing pups who became champions in agility competitions or conformation shows. Because of this, they are entitled to increase the price of their puppy.
  • Ancestral Pedigree: As described earlier, the pedigree of the dog also indicates its price. If the litter you are checking out is produced through mating two champion Corgis, they would really cost more than the usual ones.
  • Training Received: Even before the puppy is handed to you, they already received some type of training to make sure that they don’t become aggressive as you bring them home. This costs a lot, especially if the trainer is a professional.
  • Warranties and Certification: You wouldn’t want to buy a dog without health warranties and certification. These two are extremely necessary if you want the breeder to be liable for your dog even after years of being under your care.
  • Vaccination: There are a number of shots that are critical to newborn puppies, so they are already administered by the breeder’s trusted veterinarian before they ship them to you. This isn’t cheap and often added to the initial cost of the Corgi.
  • Location and of Purchase/Shipping Fee: The location you’ll buy your pup also affects its price. If you ask the breeder to have the Corgi delivered to your doorstep, you have to shoulder the shipping fee which isn’t that cheap especially if it’s air transport.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Male vs. Female Corgi: Everything You Want to Know

The Average Corgi Puppy Price From Three Different Types of Breeders

Cute purebred Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppy

As consumers, we are wired to find the best deals when we try to buy our stuff. This is all good and strategic but should not be applied when purchasing our pets.

As cliché as it may sound, when you choose to buy dogs worth $300 from a puppy mill or backyard breeder, you will really get what you paid for. That is an unhealthy dog.

In this section, you’ll see how Corgi’s price differs from the three types of breeders. Remember all the information I’ll be sharing here because they will come in handy once you are already looking for a pup to bring home.

Professional or Reputable Breeders

You should only purchase a Corgi from a professional breeder. I know this sounds so bossy, but trust me, this will benefit you.

Professional breeders are well-experienced in terms of producing healthy puppies and they also underwent rigorous training. Here are some other signs that you are dealing with one:

  • The breeder will meet you in person and ask you tons of questions to assess whether you are ready to own a Corgi or not.
  • They’ll ask you to visit the facility or the house where the pups are living. You’ll also get to meet the parents of the litter available.
  • You’ll notice that the area where the puppies are kept is well cleaned and sanitized. They also have a supply of fresh water, toys, and beds.
  • The number of puppies available is minimal because the breeder makes sure that the mother completely recuperates before producing another litter.
  • The breeder will present the health clearances of their breeding stock to prove that their puppies do not have any hereditary problems.
  • The breeder will provide you with a directory of former clients that you can contact in case you want reassurance regarding their legitimacy.
  • Before handing the dog to you, professional breeders ensure that they are already genetically tested. They also come with a guarantee, so the breeder will still be liable to the dog even after you take them home.
  • The breeder will speak with knowledge. They’ll share useful information about the Corgi’s temperament and even share some of the bad behaviors you should expect.
  • The breeder won’t allow you to take home the puppy before eight weeks old because it needs to be socialized with its mother and littermates.
  • There aren’t many breeds available because the breeder only focuses on one or two.

The Corgi price from a reputable or professional breeder is around $1,000 to $2,500. This still varies depending on the dog’s ancestry. To see how healthy Corgis from professional breeders look, watch this video of Queen Elizabeth’s royal Corgis:

Meet the Queen's Royal Corgis | Vanity Fair

Backyard Breeders

The public opinion about backyard breeders is still divided until this day which can be attributed to the fact that some of them are actually knowledgeable about pet handling.

Just to be sure that the puppy you are bringing home doesn’t come with a lot of health issues or produced because of profit, I would say skip buying from backyard breeders and find a professional one instead.

At least, even when you put on too much effort into searching for a Corgi, it will be worth it.

Here are some of the telltale signs that you are dealing with a backyard Corgi breeder:

  • They won’t screen you or ask you regarding your readiness to own a puppy.
  • They sell their puppies on pet stores and on platforms like eBay or Craigslist.
  • They don’t offer any health guarantees for their pup. In other words, they don’t have any after-sales programs.
  • They won’t be able to show you any proof that their puppies underwent genetic testing.
  • They do not have return policies if the buyer isn’t able to take good care of the Corgi.
  • They can’t show you the puppy’s veterinary record which proves that they have gotten their shots.
  • They won’t allow you to visit them for fear that you might see how unhygienic they are in keeping their pets.
  • They have you bring home the Corgi even before it turns eight weeks. This means that the pup is not socialized.
  • They don’t run out of puppies to sell all year because they do not wait for their breeding stock to recover before having them mate again.
  • They seem clueless when you ask them questions about the Corgi breed.

The Corgi price from backyard breeders is only $600 to $1,200. I know this overlaps with the price of a puppy from a professional breeder so take note of the signs I discussed above to easily distinguish one from the other.

Puppy Mills or Large Commercial Breeders

Puppy mills are ultimately the worst source for a Corgi puppy. They are known for their questionable breeding practices and their unsanitary facilities.

Unfortunately, they are still in business today according to Reader’s Digest, not because the federal government is not doing their job, but because there are still a lot of people who patronize them.

Please do not be swayed by the cheap Corgi price offered by puppy mills. Choose to be wise in your decisions and avoid this kind of breeder at all costs.

Watch out for these signs if you don’t want to deal with a puppy mill or large commercial breeder:

  • Their dogs are unclean since they lived in a cage their whole existence.
  • They won’t meet you at their home because they don’t want you to see how poor the living condition of their puppies is.
  • They can’t show you the parents of the pup you are buying.
  • There are multiple breeds that they are selling which is a sign of mass production of dogs for profit.
  • Several litters are available because they do not wait for the mother to recover before using them for another batch of Corgi production.
  • They allow you to take home the puppy before eight weeks, which means that they are not socialized and therefore may exhibit aggressive behavior.
  • The puppies did not undergo health testing; that’s why the breeder cannot present any health certificate.
  • You aren’t asked or assessed your capability in owning a dog.
  • You don’t have to sign any paperwork with them. Just pay them and bring home the puppy. That’s it.
  • They don’t offer any health guarantees.

The cost of a Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgi from a puppy mill or large commercial breeder is only around $600 to $800. Extremely cheap but extremely problematic too in the long run because the puppies are prone to so many congenital disabilities and health issues.

Initial Cost of Corgi Ownership

A woman feeding her Corgi puppy

If you think your bank account can finally breathe after buying your Corgi, you are immensely mistaken. There are still several necessary items that you have to purchase in order to provide for your puppy’s daily needs. I have listed them all below including their estimated prices.

  • Dog Food: Corgis require good quality dog food which you can easily order online from Amazon. They cost around $85.
  • Food and Water Bowl: In order for your Corgi to eat properly, they would need food and water bowls. This will help measure their kibble intake every day, as well as the amount of water they are able to consume. Usually, this costs $11.
  • Leash and Collar: Your dog should always have a leash and collar when you walk them outside, so they won’t get lost or cause trouble to strangers. These items which cost $20 are also useful during obedience training.
  • Chew Toys: A bored Corgi is quite destructive so you need to provide them with toys to chew on. The average price of chew toys in the market is $23.
  • Training Treats: No matter what type of training you are applying, you would need treats for positive reinforcement. You can buy this at Amazon for only $25.
  • Dog Bed: Similar to us humans, Corgis need a comfortable bed that will serve as their safe space. This will also let them rest peacefully after a long day of playing. The cost of this item is around $40.
  • Dog Crate: A very effective way to housetrain your Corgi is by using a dog crate. Their destructive behavior will be prevented and they will also be more secure if someone unfamiliar to them visited your home. This item is priced at $44.
  • Brush: Since Corgis are double-coated, they shed a lot. You need a good quality brush to remove lumps of hair from their coat especially during the shedding seasons. You can buy a good brush for $15.
  • Shampoo: When Corgis play, rolling over mud or getting dirty cannot be prevented. That’s why you need a dog shampoo that can remove all the dirt or debris on their coat. This item usually costs $10.
  • Urine Cleaner: If your pup is not yet housetrained, you really have to deal with the smell and stain of their urine on your floor or in their bed. To help you neutralize the odor, you need an effective urine cleaner which costs $25.
  • Poop Scooper: A poop scooper is a handy item when you need to clean your dog’s manure. This is available at pet stores near you for $20.

Below is a recap of the cost of the items I discussed above.

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
High-Quality Dog Food$85
Food and Water Bowl$11
Leash and Collar$20
Chew Toys$23
Training Treats$25
Dog Bed$40
Dog Crate$44
Brush$15
Shampoo$10
Urine Cleaner$25
Poop Scooper$20
Total Initial Cost$318

RECOMMENDED READING:
Fluffy Corgi: All You Need to Know About the Long-Haired Corgi

First-Year Expenses of Owning a Corgi Puppy

Corgi with bowls of food and water

The first year of owning a Corgi is always the most expensive. Aside from the number of dog supplies you have to purchase, you also need to make sure that they have complete shots, are given flea and tick medications, licensed and covered by insurance.

I’ll describe the importance of all the things I mentioned above as well as their cost in the list below.

  • Insurance: If you don’t want to be financially restricted when it comes to choosing a medical option for your Corgi, you need to provide them with pet insurance. The average amount that you will spend on this is $240.
  • Vaccination, Neutering, and Deworming: To prevent certain diseases, your Corgi needs to be vaccinated and dewormed. They also need to be neutered or spayed if you are not trying to breed them with other dogs. These cost $102 for the first year.
  • Flea and Tick Medication: Corgis have a stunning coat. If you want to maintain its quality, you should give your pup over the counter flea and tick medication.
  • Vet Visit: Corgis who are bought from professional breeders won’t have any alarming health issues. But if your puppy came from a puppy mill or a backyard breeder, expect to spend $400 or more for veterinarian health check-ups.
  • Dog License: This is important in tracking your dog in case they are lost since they will be given a license number and an identification tag. You can have your Corgi licensed for only $20.

The table below presents the estimated first-year expenses of owning a Corgi puppy.

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
Purebred Corgi Puppy$1,000 – $2,500
Food$945
Chew Toys$230
Training Treats$300
Insurance$240
Vaccinations, Neutering, and Deworming$102 (None if you bought your pup from a reputable breeder.)
Flea and Tick Medication$200
Vet Visit$400
Dog License$20
Total First-Year Cost$3,437 – $4,937

Monthly Cost of Owning an Adult Corgi

Interested to learn about the monthly expenses of owning a Pembroke Welsh Corgi or a Cardigan Welsh Corgi? Refer to the table below.

Type of ExpenseAverage Cost
Food$85
Treats$25
Toys$23
Health Insurance$20
Flea and Tick Medications$50
Miscellaneous Supplies$10
Total Monthly Cost$183

Lifetime Expenses of Owning a Corgi

The lifespan of a Pembroke Welsh Corgi is between 12 to 13 years. Meanwhile, a Cardigan Welsh Corgi lives up to 12 to 15 years.

If we summed up all the expenses of owning a Corgi according to their lifespan, a Pembroke Corgi owner would spend $27,593 to $31,289, while a Cardigan Corgi owner would spend $27,593 to $35,681.

Remember that this is only an estimate based on the current cost of Corgi items and services in the market.

Other Potential Expenses

Little cute Corgi dog training for competiton

The following expenses are optional, but I am including them here so you know how much they cost in case you need to avail them.

  • Daycare Services: There will be times that you need to leave town for an important event or emergency. This is where you need the help of daycare services; they will look after your pup for only $15.
  • Pet Walking Services: I get it, you’re a busy person and you don’t have time to walk your dog. Don’t fret. Just hire a pet walker for $15.
  • Kennel Club Registration: Registering your dog to a kennel organization like the American Kennel Club for $90 is necessary if you want their bloodline to be documented. Some other perks include dog shows and breed events participation.
  • Medical Treatment: As your dog ages, it becomes more fragile. They may acquire specific diseases that would need immediate treatment. Because of this, ensure that you have $150 to $1,000 to spend for their much-needed check-ups.
  • Training: Hiring a professional dog trainer is a must if you can’t handle your own pet. The minimum payment for their service is $100.
  • Pet Grooming Services: Again, this is optional, but your dog will greatly benefit if you can bring them to a professional groomer a few times a year. This costs $35 or higher depending on the type of service you will avail of.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Everything You Need to Know About the Teacup Corgi

Money-Saving Tips for Corgi Puppy Parents

You can own a Corgi without breaking the bank! Here are some tips that you might find useful:

  • Adopt instead of buying. Current adoptions fees only range from nothing to a few hundred dollars.
  • Find a veterinarian whose service is affordable but of professional quality. Don’t just choose the one near you by default.
  • Brush your Corgi’s teeth regularly, so the times you have to bring them to a professional will be lessened.
  • Make sure that you bring your dog regularly to the vet. This may sound counterintuitive but if you do so, some diseases will be diagnosed early and given proper treatment. It won’t cost you that much as compared to when their health issue is already severe.
  • Instead of buying expensive quality dog food, you can cook for them and trim half of the expenses you allot for food. Just make sure that you have researched the types of food that aren’t toxic for them.

Watch this video to learn an easy dog food recipe that is vet-approved:

Homemade Dog Food Recipe Vet Approved (Limited Ingredient)
  • Always buy in bulk, be it dog food, chew toys, treats, etc. This will save you a lot of money in shipping costs.
  • Skip the accessories because they aren’t that useful to your dog as compared to food and treats.
  • Research proper grooming techniques for your Corgi, so you’ll only have to bring them to a professional groomer a few times.

Note that all these tips aren’t meant to provide low-quality maintenance for your Corgi. You still have to offer the best care for them, so they will be around you for a long time.

Final Thoughts: Are Corgis Worth Their Price?

Corgis are incredible pets because they are smart and alert. You surely won’t regret spending $1,000 to $2,500 in purchasing them from a professional or reputable breeder.

However, you still have to assess yourself if you can finance their needs in the long run. Their first year and lifetime expenses aren’t exactly cheap, so if you aren’t financially prepared, I suggest you save a little more for this bubbly breed.

Also, don’t ever resort to buying from a puppy mill or a backyard breeder because it is a total waste of hard-earned money.

John Carter

My name is John Carter and I absolutely love pets, especially dogs. I've got a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare and have several years’ experience working in animal shelters and rescues. My passion for animals started at a very young age as I grow up on a farm with several horses, cows, cats, chickens, and dogs on our property.

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